Make Money Reviews Side Hustle

Rover Dog Sitting Review – Is Dog Walking for Money Worth it?

Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr

Dog sitting with Rover can be a nice side hustle to tack on if you enjoy the company of dogs and enjoy walks. What is awesome about Rover is that the company pretty much acts like a service directory, much like Yelp, and enables dog walkers to provide their services for upfront, transparent prices on the Rover marketplace.

Rover in many ways is flexible and can be a great source of supplementary income if you decide to become a dog walker. Dog sitting costs are climbing due to the work at home policies because of COVID-19, which means, increased pay rates for dog sitters like potentially you, yourself because everyone wants to focus on their work and not get distracted.

What is Rover?

Rover is dog sitting service directory website and app that enables dog owners to find dog sitters like you to watch over their pets during times the dog owners are unable to. The nice thing about dog sitting with Rover is that customers can leave reviews so once you got a steady stream of reviews and got the ball rolling, you are bound to get more job opportunities on the Rover website.

The key is providing good quality customer satisfaction and to be kind when providing your dog sitting services for the dog owners and for the dog to be more comfortable with you being there.

How to increase my dog sitting opportunities on Rover

The truth be told, first impressions count. If you are dog sitting for the first time for a new dog owner, I’d strongly recommend prioritizing good customer service and mannerism to win the trust of the dog owners. More often than not, dog owners like to rehire the same people they can trust with their dogs.

In other words, there is a good chance that a first impression leads to countless dog sitting opportunities down the line. I’d strongly recommend thinking long term, as opposed to your first encounter because more likely than not, the dog owner needs someone who is reliable and consistent.

How do I apply to Rover’s dog sitting application and become a dog walker?

Becoming a Rover dog sitter or walker is rather simple. You fill out the Rover job application and answer a series of simple questions after creating a Rover profile. Rover does indeed background check their dog sitters just as a heads up.

The process to become a Rover dog walker

  1. The turnaround time for your Rover profile can take anywhere between 10 to 20 business days.
  2. Once your profile has been approved, Rover will conduct a background check.
  3. If the background check clears, you are officially good to go and your dog walking services will be listed on the Rover marketplace.

Seems rather straight forward and simple right?

How much can I make with Rover?

On average if you treat Rover as a part-time job, you can easily make upwards of $1,000 a month. This generally consists of taking two or three dogs out for two weeks of the month.

The key to increasing your pay rate is having solid reviews and offering good customer service. The highest-rated dog walkers in the marketplace earn the most trust from new dog owners and are able to demand a higher pay rate.

As always, I truly believe it is best for everyone to try it out yourself and making your own conclusions if the time spent is worth it. The different U.S. cities that Rover operates in can be very niche. There may be a lot of dogs sitting competition, and sometimes not, which may enable you to demand a higher rate. Thus, it is always good to try it out yourself to see how much you can realistically make for your local neighborhood.

The case for Rover

Rover is a great side hustle if you are looking for an extra source of income, without much commitment. In many ways, dog walking to many isn’t even viewed as a job, but a leisure activity for fun. So if you find yourself enjoying the company of dogs, chances are you can be spending time with a new dog, while also making money for something you didn’t view could make money in the first place.


Editorial Disclaimer: The editorial content on this page is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are author's alone

The content of this website is for informational purposes only and does not represent investment advice, or an offer or solicitation to buy or sell any security, investment, or product. Investors are encouraged to do their own due diligence, and, if necessary, consult professional advising before making any investment decisions. Investing involves a high degree of risk, and financial losses may occur.

Advertiser Disclaimer: This blog post may contain references to products or services from one or more of our advertisers or partners. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products or services.

Just another aspiring small business owner and amateur photographer blogging in an attempt to break down personal finance lingo.

Write A Comment

Pin It